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Tuesday, July 19

  1. page Web Aggregation Tools edited What are Web Aggregation Tools? [[include component="page" page="TopicsNav"…

    What are Web Aggregation Tools?
    [[include component="page" page="TopicsNav" ]]
    Aggregation is the process of transparently gathering together distributed pieces of online content based on an interest in the topic(s), the author(s), or other shared characteristics. RSS readers are one way to aggregate data, but with the increase in personal publishing, new tools for aggregation are emerging. Using these tools, readers can easily track a distributed conversation that takes place across blogs, Twitter, and other publishing platforms, as well as pull in relevant resources from news feeds and other sources. Some educators and students are seeking alternatives to course management systems, preferring to open their discussions and make use of a variety of tools instead. Aggregation can reunite course discussions that once took place within CMS forums, even if they are scattered among different platforms and tools. Aggregation can allow a class to visualize its conversations in new ways. Information is available when and where the reader wishes, in almost any desired format.
    INSTRUCTIONS: Enter your responses to the questions below. This is most easily done by moving your cursor to the end of the last item and pressing RETURN to create a new bullet point. Please include URLs whenever you can (full URLs will automatically be turned into hyperlinks; please type them out rather than using the linking tools in the toolbar).
    Please "sign" your contributions by marking with the code of 4 tildes (~) in a row so that we can follow up with you if we need additional information or leads to examples- this produces a signature when the page is updated, like this: alan Jan 27, 2010
    (1) How might this technology be relevant to the museums you know best?
    You can bring real-time conversations and research together in a more immediate way than ever before, perhaps in the context of an actual object or exhibition. Museum sites can be portals that bring together this information with the foundation of curatorial and scholarly research. And equally, can disseminate this information out. allegra.burnette May 3, 2010
    another response here
    What is 3D Video?-(2) What themes are missing from the above description that you think are important?(2) What themes are missing from the above description that you think are important?
    Imagery can also be pulled into this through semantic web.allegra.burnette May 3, 2010
    another response here
    What is 3D Video?-(3) What do you see as the potential impact of this technology on education and interpretation in museums?(3) What do you see as the potential impact of this technology on education and interpretation in museums?
    Changes the way we teach, and also opens up new opportunities for online courses in museums. And expands the contexts in which interpretation takes place.allegra.burnette May 3, 2010
    another response here
    What is 3D Video?-(4) Do you have or know of a project working in this area?(4) Do you have or know of a project working in this area?
    [[include component="page" page="Project Form Link" ]]

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  2. page Watch Lists edited [[include component="page" page="PressClippingsNav" ]] Press Clippings: Publi…
    [[include component="page" page="PressClippingsNav" ]]
    Press Clippings: Published Technologies to Watch Lists
    This area is a place to collect "Technologies to Watch" lists published by other organizations. Though these lists and publications may serve a different audience and purpose than the Horizon Report does, they contain many useful descriptions and discussions that can and should inform our work.
    Recommended Reading
    Eye tracking tablets and the promise of text 2.0 http://www.wired.com/epicenter/2010/03/eye-tracking-tablets-and-the-promise-of-text-20/ len.steinbach May 4, 2010
    Life Online: The Web in 2020> http://www.sirc.org/publik/web2020.shtml
    aims to provide an outline and analysis not only of projected technological developments but also their social, political and economic implications. What will the Web look like in 2020? What will it do? Where will it be? How will we use it?jeremy.ottevanger Apr 28, 2010 elizabeth.babcock May 2, 2010christina.depaolo May 2, 2010
    Microsoft patents 'magic wand'
    http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/technology/8057133.stm
    Speculation grows as a newly released patent application lists Microsoft's plans for a Wii-style motion controller.
    10 Ways Social Media Will Change In 2010
    http://www.readwriteweb.com/archives/10_ways_social_media_will_change_in_2010.php?utm_source=feedburner&utm_medium=feed&utm_campaign=Feed%3A+readwriteweb+(ReadWriteWeb)&utm_content=Google+Reader
    2009 will go down as the year in which the shroud of uncertainty was lifted off of social media and mainstream adoption began at the speed of light.christina.depaolo May 2, 2010
    CES 2010: The race for the future
    http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/technology/8448859.stm
    It's January, it's Las Vegas, the City of Sin, and that means it's time for the Consumer Electronics Show. Here is the best of...
    E3 2009: Final thoughts from an E3 vet
    http://tech.yahoo.com/news/macworld/20090608/tc_macworld/e32009finalthoughtsfromane3vet
    With the cacophony of this year’s Electronic Entertainment Expo having died down, I had some lingering impressions I wanted to share
    #these Yahoo News links don't live long, do they?
    Enterprise cloud computing coming of age
    http://news.cnet.com/8301-19413_3-10346376-240.html?part=rss&subj=news&tag=2547-1_3-0-5
    A number of companies are offering more sophisticated cloud computing technology.
    E-portfolios at inaugural AUPOV conference
    http://www.flexiblelearning.net.au/flx/go/home/news/cache/bypass?sector=latest&id=4007
    Point of view (POV) devices, such as camera glasses and video cameras, are an emerging technical innovation in the vocational education and training system. So much so that the inaugural AUPOV conference being held in Wollongong on 19 June will focus solely on how POV devices can support education and training.jeremy.ottevanger Apr 28, 2010
    HOW TO: Use Twitter Hashtags for Business
    http://mashable.com/2009/09/04/twitter-hashtags-business
    Hashtags, which are an easy way to link and label Tweets, can make your business present and accessible to Twittering customers.
    IMEC unveils heart monitor for athletes, elderly
    http://news.cnet.com/8301-27083_3-10344795-247.html?part=rss&subj=news&tag=2547-1_3-0-5
    A wireless, EKG-enabled necklace transmits information to a computer.
    iRobot CEO: Robot nurses to cut health care costs
    http://news.cnet.com/8301-17938_105-10345239-1.html?part=rss&subj=news&tag=2547-1_3-0-5
    Robots can administer basic check-ups from the comfort of a patient's home. Robots send the gathered information to a health-care provider, and remind patients to take their scheduled medication.
    Kovia & The Search for Low Cost RFID Tags
    http://www.readwriteweb.com/archives/kovio_the_search_for_low_cost_rfid_tags.php
    A company called Kovia uses silicon-based ink to print RFID tags which can be attached to consumer products. Eventually the tags will enable customers to find product information, like nutritional information and sales promotions.
    Microsoft Launches Tools For Teachers
    http://www.readwriteweb.com/archives/microsoft_education_labs_launches_tools_for_teache.php
    A math worksheet generator allows teachers to enter a sample problem; the generator produces similar problems. Microsoft is developing a flashcard generator, as well (due out in 2010).
    Microsoft patents 'magic wand'
    http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/technology/8057133.stm
    Speculation grows as a newly released patent application lists Microsoft's plans for a Wii-style motion controller.
    Screens Of The Future, On Video
    http://www.npr.org/blogs/alltechconsidered/2009/06/screen_of_the_future_on_video.html?ft=1&f=102920358
    Here's the video from this week's San Antonio Society for Information Display conference, where a gander at the future of what our screens will look like could be had.
    Smart sensors power interaction
    http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/technology/8235712.stm
    New technology unveiled at the Human Computer interaction conference included sensory-replacement objects and temperature sensing devices that send text messages to your phone.
    TokBoz and EtherPad: Video Chat Gets Real-Time Document Editing
    http://www.readwriteweb.com/enterprise/2009/08/tokbox-etherpad-video-chat-gets-real-time-document-editing.php
    Combining TokBox with EtherPad allows users to video-conference and work on documents in real time. Etherpad color codes the document so each collaborator can see who's doing what.
    Top 5 Web Trends of 2009: Mobile Web & Augmented Reality
    http://www.readwriteweb.com/archives/top_5_web_trends_of_2009_mobile_web_augmented_reality.php
    The top technological trends of 2009 include the use of mobile devices to access the web and the emergence of augmented reality. elizabeth.babcock May 2, 2010
    Top 10 Consumer Web Apps of 2009
    http://www.readwriteweb.com/archives/top_10_consumer_web_apps_of_2009.php?utm_source=feedburner&utm_medium=feed&utm_campaign=Feed%3A+readwriteweb+(ReadWriteWeb)&utm_content=Google+Reader
    These are apps and services that helped consumers use the web in new ways this year; and brought technologies that were previously only geared towards advanced users to a mainstream audience. elizabeth.babcock May 2, 2010christina.depaolo May 2, 2010
    Top 10 Failures of 2009
    http://www.readwriteweb.com/archives/top_10_failures_of_2009.php?utm_source=feedburner&utm_medium=feed&utm_campaign=Feed%3A+readwriteweb+(ReadWriteWeb)&utm_content=Google+Reader
    In our yearly wrap-ups of the best products of 2009, we cannot but notice the shadow that falls over the editorial desk.christina.depaolo May 2, 2010 elizabeth.babcock May 2, 2010
    Top 10 Real-Time Technologies of 2009
    http://www.readwriteweb.com/archives/top_10_real-time_technologies_of_2009.php?utm_source=feedburner&utm_medium=feed&utm_campaign=Feed%3A+readwriteweb+(ReadWriteWeb)&utm_content=Google+Reader
    The real-time web was hot this year and it's likely to become a standard expectation on sites all around the world next year.christina.depaolo May 2, 2010
    Top 10 business technology trends for 2010
    http://www.theage.com.au/technology/enterprise/top-10-business-technology-trends-for-2010-20091214-krx0.html
    Technology never stops moving, but what are the technologies that CIOs and IT managers really need to consider in 2010?
    We sampled opinions among analysts, vendors, users, IT professionals, system integrators and pundits and came up with the following 10 to watch.christina.depaolo May 2, 2010
    Wikis in the workplace: a practical introduction
    http://arstechnica.com/business/news/2009/11/welcome-to-the-wiki-party.ars?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=rss
    The wiki crops up in many companies' internal discussions about process improvements and efficient collaboration, but it is often shot down because so few people have exposure to good models of what a really successful business wiki can do. Ars is here to help with a practical introduction based on real-world examples. elizabeth.babcock May 2, 2010christina.depaolo May 2, 2010william.real May 3, 2010
    Will Google Wave reshape enterprise IT?
    http://news.cnet.com/8301-13505_3-10268773-16.html?part=rss&subj=news&tag=2547-1_3-0-5
    Google blew the minds of developers with the introduction of its innovative Google Wave, a new approach to real-time content collaboration, but its odds of breezing into enterprise computing anytime soon remain remote.

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  3. page Visual Data Analysis edited What is Visual Data Analysis? [[include component="page" page="TopicsNav" ]…

    What is Visual Data Analysis?
    [[include component="page" page="TopicsNav" ]]
    Visual data analysis blends highly advanced computational methods with sophisticated graphics engines to tap the extraordinary ability of humans to see patterns and structure in even the most complex visual presentations. Currently applied to massive, heterogeneous, and dynamic datasets, such as those generated in studies of astrophysical, fluidic, biological, and other complex processes, the techniques have become sophisticated enough to allow the interactive manipulation of variables in real time. Ultra high-resolution displays allow teams of researchers to zoom into interesting aspects of the renderings, or to navigate along interesting visual pathways, following their intuitions and even hunches to see where they may lead. New research is now beginning to apply these sorts of tools to the social sciences as well, and the techniques offer considerable promise in helping us understand complex social processes like learning, political and organizational change, and the diffusion of knowledge.
    INSTRUCTIONS: Enter your responses to the questions below. This is most easily done by moving your cursor to the end of the last item and pressing RETURN to create a new bullet point. Please include URLs whenever you can (full URLs will automatically be turned into hyperlinks; please type them out rather than using the linking tools in the toolbar).
    Please "sign" your contributions by marking with the code of 4 tildes (~) in a row so that we can follow up with you if we need additional information or leads to examples- this produces a signature when the page is updated, like this: alan Jan 27, 2010
    (1) How might this technology be relevant to the museums you know best?
    Am curious why more museums (including my own) don't make better use of Visualizations to help people know / understand the nature of collections! Seems like a low hanging fruit that could make a significant impact on how users can "browse" massive online collections. Current online collections support search very well, but don't offer much in the way of a browsing shopping experience. Visualizations can help users understand the time distribution and relations between the works in our collection, when coupled with mapping applications could automagically generate something like the Timeline of Art History for any collection. Would also be a useful tool for curators to understand the nature and "gaps" in collecting areas to tell stories about art history in our local collections. rob.stein Apr 30, 2010 Couldn't sum this up any better than Rob, so I'll just say 'right on' here. Koven May 3, 2010 ninmah May 5, 2010
    +1 to what Rob says. Thesauri in use or implicit in our collections management systems structures would easily support anything from simple tree structures to complex networks of relationships between things, and then there are the facets of this data along agent/place/time dimensions that would all support interesting visualisations.
    Each museum will of course also have their own very individual repositories of research data, too, which can be quite indigestible in naked form but which, with intelligent use of visualisations, might be suited to educational purposes as well as other researchers.
    One other use of the tech is for museums' own analytical purposes, to understand how their digital media are having an impact. Google Analytics and the like offer a lot here, but there are sets of data around the edge of our activities that don't yet have good visualisations (for example, our presence in Twitter and other social media) jeremy.ottevanger May 1, 2010
    I'm sure many of us would welcome a trend towards museums using visual data analysis. Specifically, I would like to see visual means for providing better access to our collections. Now that many of us have large numbers of our artworks accessible online, it's a struggle to determine effective mechanisms to categorize and 'illustrate' the collection to provide intriguing entry points. The data is there, but there needs to be a commitment to the time and skill (it's not easy!) required to convert great amounts of data into seemingly simple intuitive visualizations of that information. liz.neely May 2, 2010
    As noted above, this has application both internally to help museum staff identify needs and make decisions, and externally to help people browse, search and understand collections and other museum content. Visualizations are often very effective ways for conveying complex data and relationships that are otherwise more challenging to describe. allegra.burnette May 4, 2010
    What is 3D Video?-(2) What themes are missing from the above description that you think are important?(2) What themes are missing from the above description that you think are important?
    One of the reasons that humanities collections in general are hard to visualize is the extremely multivariate nature for browsing. Lots of work on multi-variate visualization techniques has been done in the information visualization field (see InfoVis conference proceedings from IEEE) Techniques like parallel coordinates, multi-scatter plot brushing, and/or variations of treemaps might offer good approaches. rob.stein Apr 30, 2010
    Applications of image processing or content based image retrieval (CBIR) will provide good methods of visual search and browsing... these techniques are now commonly being used to drive online shopping applications and a visual "more like this" interface for ecommerce... I think that museums can make effective use of this technique to provide a browsing experience for objects without adequate meta-data catalogging. rob.stein Apr 30, 2010
    my main question is around who does this, where and with what tools. There are tools on the web, but others are installed apps. Are the web alternatives missing much, and can the installed tools output to the web? As for who, clearly museums can develop the skills required to use such tools if necessary (and to identify suitable sets of data), so perhaps the first thing we should expect to see is more use of visualisation tools by museums themselves, but how facilitating their use by educationalists? Are there ways we can enable them to create visualisations with our data using online tools? Can we expect schools to have any such tools installed themselves over the next few years, and if so should we be preparing datasets aimed at use within these? If now, will we have to send teachers/students off to make a ManyEyes account or is there server software we can install to let them create visualisations on our own websites? At the moment the barriers seem pretty high because of the learning curve and the fact that the tools and the data aren't where the people may be, so it's quite a task to bring them all together, on the web, with good ideas for what to do with them.jeremy.ottevanger May 1, 2010
    PS but beware http://www.flickr.com/photos/philgyford/4505748943/sizes/o/ jeremy.ottevanger May 1, 2010 This is awesome! Love it ninmah May 5, 2010
    PPS here's a link that's pertinent to my questions above: http://blog.blprnt.com/blog/blprnt/your-random-numbers-getting-started-with-processing-and-data-visualization
    What is 3D Video?-(3) What do you see as the potential impact of this technology on education and interpretation in museums?
    (3) What do you see as the potential impact of this technology on education and interpretation in museums?
    Sentiment analysis and language parsing of terms/concepts received via social media channels or other public forums, when coupled with information visualization, represent a huge opportunity to examine public/visitor response to artwork over time, geography, or other vectors. Visualization could potentially assist educators and curators with attenuating their programs to visitor needs by helping them detect patterns in user behavior obtained via these public channels.Koven May 3, 2010
    another response here
    What is 3D Video?-(4) Do you have or know of a project working in this area?(4) Do you have or know of a project working in this area?
    I can't seem to find a specific paper or online example to point to, but no one is doing more with visualization of museum data than Piotr Adamczyk. An accounting of recent projects can be found here (http://sites.google.com/site/pdadamczyk/), but someone else may know of other projects of his that are more visible/relevant.Koven May 3, 2010
    [[include component="page" page="Project Form Link" ]]

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  4. page Virtual Worlds edited What are Virtual Worlds? [[include component="page" page="TopicsNav" ]] Th…

    What are Virtual Worlds?
    [[include component="page" page="TopicsNav" ]]
    The capability of virtual worlds has expanded considerably in the past few years, with enormous development in building tools, climate simulators, physics engines, and the overall capability of these platforms to simulate reality. Gartner Research, Inc. has estimated that by 2011, 80% of Internet users will have an avatar in a virtual world, and hundreds of platforms to allow those avatars places to interact are already available or in development. Virtually every higher education institution has some sort of work going in around virtual spaces, and in just one platform alone, Linden Lab’s Second Life®, thousands of educational projects and experiments are actively underway. Early projects that drew heavily on real-world forms and practices gradually have given way to more experimental ventures that take advantage of the unique opportunities afforded by virtual worlds and other immersive digital environments. Now we are seeing increased use of these spaces for truly immersive forms of learning and for a level of collaboration that is erasing traditional boundaries and borders rapidly. The technology that supports virtual worlds is advancing at a rapid rate, paving the way for more realistic environments, connections between different platforms, and new ways to enter and use virtual spaces. As participation and development both continue to increase, these environments are becoming ever more interesting spaces with obvious potential for teaching, learning, and creative expression.
    INSTRUCTIONS: Enter your responses to the questions below. This is most easily done by moving your cursor to the end of the last item and pressing RETURN to create a new bullet point. Please include URLs whenever you can (full URLs will automatically be turned into hyperlinks; please type them out rather than using the linking tools in the toolbar).
    Please "sign" your contributions by marking with the code of 4 tildes (~) in a row so that we can follow up with you if we need additional information or leads to examples- this produces a signature when the page is updated, like this: alan Jan 27, 2010
    (1) How might this technology be relevant to the museums you know best?
    Virtual worlds are intrinsically highly social spaces, whose 3D characteristics lend themselves far more readily to the museum experience than ever did the 2D wallpapers of the World Wide Web.
    I would argue that holds true just as much for art museums, natural history, or local historical museums as for science or technology museums. In each case their specific mandates make their 3d screen debuts equally as well whether they are custodians of unique art or interesting in framing scientific issues or historical narratives. The sense of 'walking round' the gallery, taken together with the social interaction between avatars sharing the same vantage point is far closer to a typical museum experience than the web page metaphor ever was.
    susan.hazan Apr 30, 2010
    Virtual worlds offer museum visitors the opportunity to experience activities not possible in the real world as well as a space for international educational collaborations and workshops. phyllis.hecht May 2, 2010
    The unique affordances of virtual worlds for learning purposes are many: a) they allow you to mimic scientific processes in an hour, day, or few days that take millenia in the real world (e.g. fossilization); b) they allow learners to explore, manipulate, destroy, excavate virtual artifacts and specimens in a risk-free environment; c) they often can reach hundreds of thousands of users--folks that otherwise would not have access to your collection; d) vws can facilitate collaboration among learners through time, in a way that is not always possible through on-site learningelizabeth.babcock May 2, 2010
    What is 3D Video?-(2) What themes are missing from the above description that you think are important?(2) What themes are missing from the above description that you think are important?
    I feel that the Gartner Research, Inc. link is now outdated as at a glance from Google Trends for Second Life http://www.google.com/trends?q=second+life shows. While at the time of the Gartner Report (2007) Second Life was at its peak, it has long since left its hype high and has fallen deep into its long tail. For museums, SL was never a long term solution anyway, as the prohibition of under 18 year olds goes against the museum mission of open access for all. If a family or school group can not enter SL, then the museum has no business even being there. Having said this, new 3D platforms are emerging and new solutions are just around the corner; browser-based virtual worlds and Open Sim solutions. In this case SL has a critical role for the museum as a platform where museums can learn how to act in this kind of arena and get their water wings as we all once needed to do in the early 1990's.
    susan.hazan
    I agree with Susan that virtual worlds will progress beyond Second Life to those with less of a learning curve, easier access, and open to a broader audience. Perhaps missing from the above description is an emphasis on the real-time aspect of virtual worlds for learning, collaboration, and social interaction. The Tech Museum for instance gathers people from around the world to experiment and prototype exhibitions in real-time in SL. My online classes, which include students from around the world, are able to enjoy museum field trips together in Second Life. phyllis.hecht May 2, 2010
    Utilization of some virtual world exhibitions and spaces can be lower than hoped/desired; costs for creating and maintaining virtual worlds can be excessive, especially for the graphics-intensive 3D worlds; making smart choices between social networks, online gaming and virtual worlds can be tricky---not every learning objective requires a virtual world; accuracy and realism can be more important for some projects than others, and can help dictate choice of type of virtual world; partnerships with established virtual world providers can be cost effective and leverage the strengths of each partner organization. elizabeth.babcock May 2, 2010
    What is 3D Video?-(3) What do you see as the potential impact of this technology on education and interpretation in museums?(3) What do you see as the potential impact of this technology on education and interpretation in museums?
    While the WWW version of a museum never competed with the physical museum, the virtual world certainly can compete with 2D legacy solutions; webinars, virtual tours for the single user, database-driven online collections.
    The activities that the museum can explore in a virtual world include all of the previous with added potential for:
    Guided tours
    Gallery talks
    Concerts
    Courses
    Seminars
    Workshops
    Basically almost any kind of social activity a museum might wish to host in its physical space
    susan.hazan Apr 30, 2010
    The Exploratorium has used Second Life to great advantage, offering avatars tours of the universe and other experiential activities that leverage the capabilities of a 3D environment – things not possible in the physical space of the museum. I think that virtual worlds can be a great training ground for our future museum professionals for activities such as learning to interpret objects or prototyping exhibitions. phyllis.hecht May 2, 2010
    What is 3D Video?-(4) Do you have or know of a project working in this area?(4) Do you have or know of a project working in this area?
    The Staatliche Kunstsammlungen's, Old Masters Picture Gallery, Dresden is an excellent example of a Second Life Museum in Second Life. This museum is located on its own island which hosts an impressive replica of the Staatliche Kunstsammlungen's Old Masters Picture Gallery in Dresden. This sim has been fully authorized by the mother institution who remind us how 'the locations of many famous masterpieces, such as Raphael’s “Sistine Madonna” or Giorgione’s “Sleeping Venus” have been transposed to this beautifully modeled museum, and have been reconstructed, true to scale to includes all of the 750 masterpieces in the permanent exhibition'.
    The Israel Museum, Jerusalem created a sim of the Shrine of the Book in SL in tandem with a 3-day conference on the Dead Sea Scrolls. While the physical conference brought together 120 specialists from all over the world to the museum campus to discuss the latest in manuscript research, the Shrine of the Book sim in SL hosted a webcast of the 3-day lectures and an alternative platform to stage further interaction and live discussion.
    susan.hazan Apr 30, 2010
    The Exploratorium in Second Life: http://www.exploratorium.edu/worlds/secondlife/
    The Tech Museum: http://thetechvirtual.org/ phyllis.hecht May 2, 2010
    Cao Fei's project RMB City http://artforum.com/video/mode=large&id=21841.
    Nettrice Gaskin's work in 4D with both high school and college students http://babel.massart.edu/~nettrice/visual_language/ rosanna.flouty May 4, 2010
    **The Field Museum's virtual coral reef on Whyville at http://reef.whyville.net; also I Dig Zambia and I Dig Tanzania using Second Life--virtual paleontology excavations.elizabeth.babcock May 2, 2010
    [[include component="page" page="Project Form Link" ]]

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  5. page Twitter edited Horizon Report in Twitter Follow what people are talking about on Twitter about the Horizon Rep…

    Horizon Report in Twitter
    Follow what people are talking about on Twitter about the Horizon Report.

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  6. page Trends edited Research Question 4: Key Trends What trends do you expect to have a significant impact on the w…

    Research Question 4: Key Trends
    What trends do you expect to have a significant impact on the ways in which museums use technologies to service mission mandated goals related to education and interpretation?
    INSTRUCTIONS: Enter your responses to the questions below. This is most easily done by moving your cursor to the end of the last item and pressing RETURN to create a new bullet point. Please include URLs whenever you can (full URLs will automatically be turned into hyperlinks; please type them out rather than using the linking tools in the toolbar).
    As you review what others have written, please add your thoughts and comments as well.
    Please "sign" each of your contributions by marking with the code of 4 tildes (~) in a row so that we can follow up with you if we need additional information or leads to examples- this produces a signature when the page is updated, like this: alan Jan 27, 2010
    Compose your entries like this:
    Trend Name. Add your ideas here with a few sentences of description, including full URLs for references (e.g. http://horizon.nmc.org). And do not forget to sign your contribution with 4 ~ (tilde) characters!
    The abundance of resources and relationships induced by open resources and social networks is increasingly challenging us to revisit our roles as educators in sense-making, coaching and credentialing. Access to educational materials of all kinds has never been so easy or so open as it is today, and this trend is only increasing. The sage-on-the-stage model of teaching, where the instructor holds all the information and all the cards, is simply not applicable in this world of instant access. Educators must respond by changing their roles to reflect the new need to guide and coach students in finding, interpreting, and building an understanding from multiple sources of information. [From 2010 Horizon Report] Larry Apr 28, 2010
    Agreed, the battle to get our content and data out there is being won and perhaps the penudulum will swing back towards interpreting again - it's one thing to say, ours is not the only interpretation, but it's another to abrogate the responsibility to provide any interpretation or sense whatsoever, so I expect new ways of doing this (perhaps in social contexts) to develop.jeremy.ottevanger May 3, 2010
    I also believe this will continue to grow as a challenge. scott.sayre May 3, 2010 The locus of this issue is on the curator; over and over again we hear about the "changing" role of the curator in this new ecosystem. I'm not sure that the curator's role really changes that much--the curator is still selecting what to present and what not to present--it just means that user-generated (read: 'non-professional') content is now included in that mix. Koven May 3, 2010
    I haven't been sure just where to put this thought, but I do think that making use of social networks in a meaningful, real way remains a challenge for museums. I have looked in on various attempts to make blogs, facebook, and related efforts work, and they always feel like prototypes for efforts that may or may not really take root. Ditto x 20 for twitter, which museums are using in the most brain deadening and spammish way as far as I can tell (and I'm following about 10 museums right now but considering tossing in the towel on that). We know that social networks are powerful, and we know that people like socializing in museums; but what's the best way to join those two realities? I'm personally not sure, but open to any successful case studies and lessons learned. john.weber May 4, 2010
    Engaged citizenship is increasingly enabled by technology, political awareness, engagement and just-in-time learning. Mobile technologies and new media show strong promise to improve civic participation and social inclusion for youth. Further, the growing trend of embedding media and connectivity into the urban fabric is opening up new forms of social and civic engagement. Students are able to be more connected with the world than previously, leading to increased levels of participation in social and civic activities.[From 2010 Horizon Report] Larry Apr 28, 2010 Except they are more interested in being engaged when they are voting for their favorite in American Idol or some reality show rather than actual civic participation susan.hazan May 4, 2010
    Increasingly, we expect to be connected wherever we go. Wireless network access, mobile networks, and personal portable networks have made it easy to remain connected almost anywhere. We are increasingly impatient of places where it is not possible, or where it is prohibitively expensive, to be connected, such as airplanes in flight and countries outside our own mobile networks. The places where we cannot connect are shrinking—some flights provide wireless access, for instance—and our expectations of immediate access to our personal information, multi-level communication, and interaction with the world are more frequently met.[From 2010 Horizon Report] Larry Apr 28, 2010 +1Koven May 3, 2010
    More and more, people expect to be able to work, learn, study, and connect with their social networks wherever and whenever they want to. We are not tied to desks anymore when we wish to use computers. Workers increasingly expect to be able to work from home or from the road, and most everyone expects to be able to get information, addresses, directions, reviews, and answers whenever they want. Mobile access to information is changing the way we plan everything from outings to errands. A corollary of this trend is the expectation that people will be available and online, anywhere and anytime.[From 2010 Horizon Report] Larry Apr 28, 2010 susan.chun May 4, 2010
    Indeed, we learned this through working with teachers during MET's Summer Teacher Institute. They loved to do their homeoworks, including joining a chat room session, doing a research online or writing a blog, on the beach while they are vacationing with their families. I am not kidding as they had showed us picture somewhere in Mexico. herminia.din May 3, 2010
    Open Brand I think we are still at the beginning of the articulation of the "open brand" at museums where the visitors are the educators, they are the curators and shape their learning experience. At Museums and the web 2010, I saw examples from the Powerhouse, Smithsonian, & SFMOMA, where visitors needs shape the web project, strategy, or party. I only see this going from an isolated group of key leaders to a hemispheric shift in thinking everywhere. http://theopenbrand.resource.com/christina.depaolo May 2, 2010
    creating community learning networks in which a variety of different institutions (museums of different types and sizes, schools, libraries, youth organizations) are linked in common community learning efforts.marsha May 2, 2010
    Cross-institution collaboration is another way to share resources. Many roadblocks along the way, but it is something to consider, repurpose and reuse digital content. herminia.din May 3, 2010 I agree here, but I think we might also want to focus on the changing nature of that collaboration. The days of gigantic, multi-year, foundation-funded collaborative projects are probably on the wane. Increasingly, multi-institutional collaboration will probably occur more at the data level (think APIs, Linked Data, etc.), with institutions being collaborative partners only in a passive sense, and the real work of pulling multiple resources together being accomplished downstream, possibly by third-party orgs.Koven May 3, 2010 Yes. (Or, put as simply as possible for the report's executive audience, we need to be aware of the ways in which our content--including, but not limited to unmediated collections data--may be seen and used in the broader networked environment.) susan.chun May 4, 2010 A good example is Artbabble - how can an single museum put out such rich resources? - these days it take a substantial partnership to deliver quality susan.hazan May 4, 2010
    Cross-institution collaborations and sharing of resources (staff, tools, content, training) will be key to survival of some small museums phyllis.hecht May 3, 2010 I so agree susan.hazan May 4, 2010
    I care more about you say then what the expert says Thanks to Twitter I now learn more about my industry from the novice than from the expert, or if the expert is sharing it is because of my connection with them as an individual who has a real personality than as an "icon" of industry.christina.depaolo May 2, 2010 I think this is true, but we also hear from students that they want to know what the experts think since they already hear a lot of what their friends think.scott.sayre May 3, 2010 I think we might want to fold these two points into the "...abundance of resources and relationships..." point; the issue here is how (as opposed to whether) museums are going to incorporate user-generated-content into their interpretive strategies.Koven May 3, 2010 Right, and I think it's awfully important to remember that the expert/public dichotomy can be a false one. There are exceptionally interesting opportunities for museums to recognize and promote user-generated content from experts outside of our own domain, not just in our educational and interpretive strategies, but also in our research and scholarship.susan.chun May 4, 2010
    Online play as well as work. Increasingly we expect to have access to online gaming. The gaming industry projects revenues from online gaming to reach $24 billion in 2013. Play time must chunk into smaller fragments reflecting available time slots, yet present a continuous persuasive narrative. mike.kelly May 2, 2010
    How can museum create an online game that is not boring? How long would take you to finish a museum game, 1, 2 3 minutes? Do you know in some online games, it will take you several months or longer to be "good" at it? herminia.din May 3, 2010
    Schools will increasingly look to digital learning technologies as a way to quickly improve student achievement. However, these technologies may not substantively improve students' abilities to drive their own learning. Museums will become increasingly relevant as hubs where interest-driven, authentic experiences are provide. School districts will increasingly contract museums to provide these experiences, though scaling up will remain a challenge for museums. elizabeth.babcock May 2, 2010
    Can we create a game like Webkinz or Club Penguin, even Lego Universe that kids will spend hours in there and "figure out" how to win a trophy in an arcade game, get a rare item in the "trading room", or strategize how to make virtual dollars to satisfy their consuming needs? herminia.din May 3, 2010 I don't think we can (or should) compete against corporate, for-profit platforms - we have to find our own voice in the gaming sector - we need to do do what we are good at, NOT penguin-paid-for-trifles and NOT toy animals that parents have to buy when their children demand susan.hazan May 4, 2010
    Cell phone coverage and smart phone technology will improve to the point that mobile apps in museums are the norm--not a novelty.elizabeth.babcock May 2, 2010
    Museum education projects go increasingly international as museums become more sophisticated about integrating learners abroad through massive multiplayer games, citizen science project, and social justice programs. This will challenge existing museum notions about cultivating audiences that can visit the museum. elizabeth.babcock May 2, 2010
    Object-based learning practices developing in schools, which can obviously be facilitated by the online and offline museumjeremy.ottevanger May 3, 2010
    The Value of Rich Media - Collection related rich media are becoming increasingly valuable assets in digital interpretation.. Museums are beginning to see the value in developing formal strategies capturing quality media documentation at every opportunity.scott.sayre May 3, 2010 Agreed!!! My teaching of contemporary art has been dramatically enhanced by YouTube alone, and by much of the great video that is now available of artists discussing their work. Just yesterday in my installations and site-specific art class we were looking at Cai Guo Qiang's explosion pieces in a student's report, an experience that far outweighs and out-teaches seeing still photos of them. It is a simple thing, but truly meaningful in the educational domain. When I teach the "Bean" in Chicago, I'm mostly using images pilfered from Flickr. We have moved from an economy of image scarcity to image superabundance, and that includes the moving image now. john.weber May 4, 2010 Absolutely. But I see this as aspirational--a challenge as much as a trend, since despite our general agreement as a community about the ubiquity and importance of short video as a tool for teaching and learning, the museum community hasn't really (with some notable exceptions, and some key non-museum players such as Art21 and Smarthistory) figured out how to create and distribute quality video as a regular product. susan.chun May 4, 2010 Agreed ninmah May 5, 2010
    Cross-curricular learning has long been important in primary education but seems to be increasingly so, in the UK at least. It's also likely, I believe, to take root more within secondary education.jeremy.ottevanger May 3, 2010
    Networked learning – collaborations across counties, countries, continents jeremy.ottevanger May 3, 2010
    LAM convergence. Cross-organisational collaboration (as Gunter Waibel of the OCLC has talked extensively about) as well as inter-organisational collaboration in projects like Europeana.jeremy.ottevanger May 3, 2010
    Linked data/semantic web and open data. No getting away from the steady spread of ideas and practice here, and I expect to see vendors starting to build capability into collections management systems, as well as governments, agencies and funders beginning to mandate the release of more data, hopefully to agreed standards. It won't happen overnight but there's an understanding of the pinch points (for example, pay-walled vocabularies) and I think momentum building to overcome themjeremy.ottevanger May 3, 2010 Yes, yes! Koven May 3, 2010 susan.chun May 4, 2010 yes susan.hazan May 4, 2010
    Finding things to do with the linked data. The use-cases and examples for linked data (or API) usage have been limited whilst suitable data sources have been lacking, but one will encourage the other as the data starts to appear. More critical than museum data, I think, is the matrix of contextual data in which it sits and which can then inspire people to think of new things to do with cultural heritage info. With lots of non-CH data appearing from governments, new agencies, scientists etc, many more uses of CH data become possible.jeremy.ottevanger May 3, 2010 +1Koven May 3, 2010 yes susan.hazan May 4, 2010
    Multi-linguality. It's already been pointed out that translation tools are getting pretty good, and that we will be addressing educational audiences across the globe. There are also projects (some of them aligned with Europeana) to bring machine translation and vocabulary alignment into massive harvested datasets and make discovery truly multilingual.jeremy.ottevanger May 3, 2010 +1Koven May 3, 2010 susan.chun May 4, 2010 +1 allegra.burnette May 4, 2010 bring in SKOS - not everyone speaks English susan.hazan May 4, 2010
    VLEs come of age? Cultural heritage content chanelled into virtual learning environments either directly or through third parties like CHIN, Collections Autralia, Europeana or Magic Studio. I think this will require a push from strategic bodies like, in the UK, the Collections Trust or perhaps BECTA.jeremy.ottevanger May 3, 2010
    Seamless experience across devices. People expect an experience to be different on different devices, but they will expect it to be possible to do their thing on whatever they have to hand, and I think that after the current experimental phase of building apps etc for all sorts of different platforms we'll see a retrenchment and efforts to ensure that we offer consistent experiences where it matters. This may well mean going back to standards! So perhaps the trend here is, HTML5 adoption (and the lingering death of Flash?)jeremy.ottevanger May 3, 2010
    I would push this a bit further and say there are some efforts towards using technology to make more of a seamless experience between institutions as well.scott.sayre May 3, 2010 +1allegra.burnette May 4, 2010
    Strengthening of digital identity. I expect the idea of using a core identity (or more than one) to access many services to take root in the public mind, to become a norm, and i expect to see more museums gain the skills and confidence to offer user-tied experiences using these identities.jeremy.ottevanger May 3, 2010 Are we loosing or gaining with our distributed identities? I cant even remember all those passwords that lock me in/out of myself any more ... what do museums have to say about this? Is the museum just another login/password stop-over or is something truly meaningful happening in our sector? susan.hazan May 4, 2010
    Development of digital expertise in more parts of the organisation, digital departments as facilitators and commissioners. Many museums have poor organisational structures with regard to digital media, but the fact is that it’s a multi-facetted thing which requires knowledge and agendas that relate to learning, scholarship, information management, design, marketing, media creation, rights etc. It’s hard for many museums to encapsulate all of these within a single department. I expect that as understanding of the digital aspects of these issues develops within the relevant specialised parts of museums, digital media departments will focus more on co-ordinating and facilitating cross-departmental projects and supply a more tightly-bound set of expertise and skills, possibly out-source more non-core work but (hopefully) focus on developing and managing core systems that tie all the bits together. jeremy.ottevanger May 3, 2010 +1allegra.burnette May 4, 2010
    On Demand everything. Equipped with smart handhelds, we need to be able to provide useful information parsed in meaningful and relevant segments when and where our visitors might 'demand' it. liz.neely May 3, 2010 I'd like to widen the scope of this trend to incorporate location more generally. The ability for users to access museum content anywhere significantly alters the landscape of what's possible--it puts museum content into users' lives without them necessarily having made a deliberate decision to access museum content at all. Koven May 3, 2010Agreed! scott.sayre May 3, 2010
    Hosted resources - From cell phone tour authoring tools to Pachyderm, many museum educational programs are beginning to rely on technology services maintained outside of the museum walls. Some of these decisions are made for the sake of efficiency, other are made to skirt internal rules and political barriers. I personally believe this is part of the reason Web 2.0 technologies have been so widely adopted.scott.sayre May 3, 2010
    Metrics and measurement - increasingly sophisticated tools for data analysis and visualization will encourage museums and funders to consider performance metrics in planning and funding programs and initiatives. susan.chun May 4, 2010
    Digitization efforts - though not new, digitization and cataloguing projects continue to require a significant share of museum resources. What is new is the scale and sophistication these efforts, and the interest that museums and funders are showing in building genuine strategic positions around them. susan.chun May 4, 2010
    The diversified work portfolio: Just as we'd be crazy to put all of our retirement funds into a single investment, it's not very safe for any of us, museum professionals included, to rely on a single job - as so many have found out in the recent economic downturn. But putting all of our eggs into a single job basket has been hard to avoid until recently. Now, one of the arguably positive outcomes of constrained resources on museums and academic institutions alike has been their willingness - even need - to encourage part-time working, which allows museum professionals to have multiple revenue streams. While this is easier in countries with socialized medicine, it is a double-edged sword that culture workers may be able to turn to their favor. Although managing many part-time jobs is a challenge, it also means that losing one doesn't cut off all income. Also on the up-side are possibilities to work simultaneously in more than one discipline, creating a whole that is greater than the sum of its parts in terms of professional skills and experiences. I don't want to celebrate our economic disadvantages or encourage museums not to compensate their workers properly, but it is interesting to see how some lemonade can be made from our current crop of economic lemons. Just as young people are no longer entering the workforce expecting a lifetime career with the same organization (and generally do not want that), maybe we're now heading to a cultural economy in which we'll manage a portfolio of jobs and simultaneous incomes for our careers as well. nancy.proctor May 4, 2010nancy.proctor
    Group-based Learning via Mobile Devices: The emergence of tablet-based computing opens new opportunity for museums to support new forms of social interaction around shared devices. Most museum visitors come in groups and tablet-based computing offers a variety of new options to support group-based computing and richer media driven experiences.scott.sayre May 4, 2010

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  7. page TopicsNav edited Horizon Topics 3D Printing 3D Video Alternative Licensing Augmented Reality Cellular Networ…

    Horizon Topics
    3D Printing
    3D Video
    Alternative Licensing
    Augmented Reality
    Cellular Networks
    Cloud Computing
    Collaborative Environments
    Collective Intelligence
    Context-Awareness
    Digital Identity
    Electronic Books
    Game-Based Learning
    Geolocation
    Gesture-Based Computing
    Learning Objects
    Location-Based Services
    Mobiles
    New Scholarship
    Online Communication
    Open Content
    Personal Learning Environments
    Semantic Web
    Smart Classrooms
    Smart Objects
    Social Media
    Social Networking
    Tagging
    Telepresence
    Thin Film Displays
    Virtual Worlds
    Visual Data Analysis
    Web Aggregation Tools
    Wireless Power
    What's Missing?
    Add a New Topic

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  8. page Topic Cloud edited [[include component="tagCloud" ]]

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  9. page Timeline edited 2010 Horizon.museum Report Timeline Date Activity April 15, 2010 Advisory Board convened Ap…

    2010 Horizon.museum Report Timeline
    Date
    Activity
    April 15, 2010
    Advisory Board convened
    April 23-26, 2010
    Wiki Orientations for Advisory Board As Needed
    April 23-30, 2010
    Advisory Board reviews/adds to Press Clippings
    April 27-May 3, 2010
    Advisory Board answers the Research Questions
    May 4-9, 2010
    Advisory Board makes first pass at Rankings
    May 10-17, 2010
    NMC Staff produce the "Short List"
    May 18-23, 2010
    Advisory Board makes final pass at Rankings
    May 24 - June 15, 2010
    NMC Staff write the 2010 Horizon Report: Museum Edition
    June 15, 2010
    Final Draft of Report sent to Advisory Board
    June 15 - June 28, 2010
    Report in Layout and Design
    June 28, 2010
    Advance copy of published report to Advisory Board in PDF format
    July 12, 2010 {clear250.gif}
    2010 Horizon Report: Museum Edition released
    The most critical weeks for Advisory Board members are April 27-May 3 when the data are collected, then May 4 - 9 and May 18-23, when the two rounds of rankings are produced. These dates are highlighted in red.

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  10. page Thin Film Displays edited What are Thin Film Displays? [[include component="page" page="TopicsNav" ]]…

    What are Thin Film Displays?
    [[include component="page" page="TopicsNav" ]]
    Computer displays continue to develop in ways that are enabling whole new categories of devices. Flexible screens that can wrap around curved surfaces are in prototype, as are small, very thin interactive screens like the Plastic Logic Reader. Thin film screen technology allows displays to be literally printed onto plastic, along with the batteries that power them, enabling the sorts of live motion displays previously only hinted about in Harry Potter movies. Already in the marketplace is “video in print,” very thin flexible displays that can be easily inserted into popular magazines; CBS and Entertainment Weekly were first to demonstrate this new technology in the fall of 2009. When the technology is developed fully it will enable integrated interactive display devices that combine input and output in a single interface, finally realizing the full potential of electronic paper.
    Thin film displays, because of their flexibility and low cost, are certain to become part of everyday educational materials like periodicals, textbooks, and imaging tools. Manufacturers like Sony, Phillips, and Samsung are working on bringing flexible and ultra-thin screens to market. Based on organic light-emitting diode (OLED) technology, in which the pixels emit their own light, these sorts of screens can be extremely thin. Since no separate light source is required, OLED screens can easily be placed into all manner of devices. While perhaps best thought of as an enabling technology at this point, with learning applications still some years away, the displays thin film technology enables are so cheap and so easily manufactured that whole new categories of devices using them are likely.
    INSTRUCTIONS: Enter your responses to the questions below. This is most easily done by moving your cursor to the end of the last item and pressing RETURN to create a new bullet point. Please include URLs whenever you can (full URLs will automatically be turned into hyperlinks; please type them out rather than using the linking tools in the toolbar).
    Please "sign" your contributions by marking with the code of 4 tildes (~) in a row so that we can follow up with you if we need additional information or leads to examples- this produces a signature when the page is updated, like this: alan Jan 27, 2010
    (1) How might this technology be relevant to the museums you know best?
    I can see how, once this technology comes to market at low cost, it could indeed rapidly become widespread in an educational context. I'm not yet clear on whether it will imply significant changes in interface design or the kind of content we create, but I'm sure it could be a great new route to market for that content. jeremy.ottevanger May 1, 2010
    Often in a gallery/exhibition situation, the need exists for more information about an object(s) than can be delivered by traditional labeling. Additional labeling would so intrusive to the viewer's experience that the object(s) being interpreted might become visually secondary to the label. Thin film display technology allows not only more flexibility in this regard, but also is changeable and updatable in place as need arises.david.dean May 1, 2010
    Agreed. The capacity to add varying degrees of depth in gallery signage is potentially very useful. The capacity to put video and high resolution graphics alongside text, cheaply, with a superthin form factor would be great. Artists will do cool things with this, too. john.weber May 4, 2010
    What is 3D Video?-(2) What themes are missing from the above description that you think are important?(2) What themes are missing from the above description that you think are important?
    I wonder if strategic alliances with traditional publishers will be needed/helpful, at least in scenarios where content is inserted into printed material? Or agents analogous to the Bridgeman Art Library, to channel museum content to publishers?jeremy.ottevanger May 1, 2010
    another response here
    What is 3D Video?-(3) What do you see as the potential impact of this technology on education and interpretation in museums?(3) What do you see as the potential impact of this technology on education and interpretation in museums?
    When incorporated, thin film displays (TFD) can offer several advantages and new options to the exhibition interpretation landscape: 1.) TFD can fulfill the traditional role of printed labels for exhibits. High contrast, clear lettering is both legible and makes readability more likely. As color becomes more available through OLED technology, this will add another dimension to the possibilities as well. The ability to remotely change the content means that information can be updated, corrected, or changed completely to meet specific display or interpretative needs. 2.) Allowing scrolling of content would afford visitors the opportunity to satisfy their need for "more information" upon demand without increasing the physical design space required for the label. 3.) The physical flexibility of the TFD medium allows for signage or labels to be affixed in non-traditional spaces and ways, such affixed to ceilings or floors, or curvilinear or hard-edged surfaces. 4.) Taking TFD "off the wall" and placing it in the visitor's hands affords the possibility of a carry-along single sheet resource for visitors or students that can deliver personally-determined exploratory experiences. Basic information can be made available with highlighted link words or phrases that can be touch activated to call up additional content, illustrations, videos, etc.david.dean May 1, 2010
    Along with mobiles, this technology might find a way into various small handhelds that would be more attractive to users than the current generation of PDA-type devices. john.weber May 4, 2010
    What is 3D Video?-(4) Do you have or know of a project working in this area?(4) Do you have or know of a project working in this area?
    [[include component="page" page="Project Form Link" ]]

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